Alphaville (1965)

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Alphaville
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Directed by Jean-Luc Godard
Produced by André Michelin
Written by Jean-Luc Godard
Starring Eddie Constantine
Anna Karina
Akim Tamiroff
Howard Vernon
Music by Paul Misraki
Cinematography Raoul Coutard
Distributed by Athos Films
Release dates
5th May 1965
Running time
99 minutes
Country France
Language French
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What I like about Alphaville by Jean-Luc Godard is that in the city of the future, those who behave illogically, are publically executed by women in swimming costumes, weilding knives. There is that, and the circles.

Alphaville combines the genres of dystopian science fiction and film noir. There are no special props or futuristic sets; instead, the film was shot in real locations in Paris, the night-time streets of the capital becoming the streets of Alphaville, while modernist glass and concrete buildings (that in 1965 were new and strange architectural designs) represent the city's interiors.

The film is set in the future but the characters also refer to twentieth century events; for example, the hero describes himself as a Battle of Guadalcanal veteran.

Expatriate American actor Eddie Constantine plays Lemmy Caution, a trenchcoat-wearing secret agent. Constantine had already played this or similar roles in dozens of previous films; the character was originally created by British pulp novelist Peter Cheyney.

However, in Alphaville, director Jean-Luc Godard moves Caution away from his usual twentieth century setting, and places him in a futuristic sci-fi dystopia, the technocratic dictatorship of Alphaville.


What Do You Think?

I saw Alphaville last night and thought it was one of the worst, most pathetic films ever made. I said as much to my girlfriend, but, to my surprise she countered that I was "not getting it" and the movie was "a parody" of sci-fi films, she claimed.

I have to admit the movie was ridiculous enough to admit this explanation... does anyone know whether Godard was indeed parodying the sci-fi genre? Or was he being serious with this ignorant, whiny tripe?

Every Lars Van Teir movie ends with the Protagonist being raped or murdered or raped and murdered. Every Harmonie Korine movie has someone getting murdered and none of the other characters cares.

eh bien - WHAT GIVES?

Lest Ye Forget

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